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Report Vaccines Linked to Allergy Epidemic

Issued: 2018-03-26

Image Credits: WMP.

The global prevalence of allergic diseases is skyrocketing, affecting 30% to 40% of the world’s population.

Allergic conditions include food allergies, anaphylaxis, asthma, eczema, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis and reactions to drugs and insects.

Often, these burdensome conditions start young, are overlapping and have the potential to be severe or fatal.

A study of children with peanut allergy, for example, found that the median age of onset was 12 months; 40% to 60% of peanut-allergic children had concurrent asthma, atopic dermatitis, and/or other food allergies; and over a third (35%) had experienced anaphylaxis upon initial peanut exposure.

Anaphylactic outcomes are worse when multiple allergic conditions are present.

In the U.S., food allergies are widespread and are the most common cause of anaphylaxis in children.

One in 13 American children—about two per classroom—has at least one food allergy, and food allergies increased by 50% from 1997 to 2011.

An analysis of New York City school system data showed that the incidence of epinephrine administration for severe food allergy increased threefold from 2007 to 2013.

Likewise, an escalating number of children have been hospitalized for food allergies or have visited an emergency department for primarily food-related anaphylaxis over the past couple of decades.

Similar trends are playing out all over the world.

As each new decade ushers in higher childhood allergy rates, researchers mostly have scratched their heads, citing the poorly operationalized “hygiene hypothesis” or feebly asserting that the reasons for the increase remain “unclear.”

A few investigators have pointed to possible risk factors such as cesarean delivery and novel food technologies.

However, given that the hallmark of allergic disease is an altered immune response, it stands to reason that vaccines— which purposefully set out to “reprogram immunity”—are major contenders as allergy triggers.

In her 2011 book, The Peanut Allergy Epidemic, Heather Fraser assembles persuasive scientific and historical evidence that lays the blame for the mass peanut allergy phenomenon (and the steep rise in childhood allergies of all types) on the “extensive and sudden” changes made to childhood vaccine programs in the U.S. and elsewhere in the late 1980s.

According to Fraser, a series of critical factors synergistically converged during this time period to create a perfect storm and launch the allergy and chronic illness epidemics that have been ongoing ever since.

These factors include:

A study conducted in 2012 and published in 2017 in the Journal of Translational Sciencecompared chronic health problems in vaccinated and unvaccinated 6-to-12-year-olds—in other words, children born between 2000 and 2006.

The results lend credence to Fraser’s thinking about vaccination and allergy trends.

Among many striking results, the authors found that vaccinated children had a significantly greater odds of having a diagnosed allergic condition compared to unvaccinated children: 10.4% versus 0.4% for allergic rhinitis, 22.2% versus 6.9% for “other” allergies and 9.5% versus 3.6% for eczema and other forms of atopic dermatitis.

Other studies also have linked vaccines to atopic conditions and allergic sensitization.

To grasp how the chain of vaccine-related events initiated roughly 30 years ago has bred today’s worldwide allergy epidemics, one has to understand that vaccines, by their very nature, induce an unnatural immune response.

This property of vaccines is called “immunogenicity.”

Pharmaceutical researchers note that it can be tricky to achieve “wanted” immunogenicity while avoiding “unwanted” immune responses that later result in “clinically adverse consequences.”

Considering this question, Fraser calls attention to an important 1991 paper in The Quarterly Review of Biology that put forth the plausible view of allergy as an evolutionary form of immunological defense against “commonly allergenic” toxins, including metals and carcinogens.

From this perspective, allergy symptoms (such as vomiting, sneezing and decreased blood pressure) are logical bodily responses intended to expel toxic substances or slow their circulation in the body.

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